The Anthologist

58 Gresham Street, The City, London

It’s a modern, quirky place in the heart of the City and would be an ideal place for groups of young friends after work.

The Anthologist picture

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Address:58 Gresham Street
The City
London
EC2V 7BB
Map:Map & nearby
Venue Type:Night Clubs
Region:The City
Nearest Station:Bank
Telephone:
Opening Hours:

Mon – Weds: 07:30 – 23:00
Thurs – Fri: 07:30 – 00:00
Sat & Sun: available for private hire
About: The Anthologist bar and club is a brand new multi-million pound venue and classy cocktail bar offering our guests something different to the standard West End clubbing scene.

By day The Anthologist is a classy restaurant and bar and on Saturday nights is transformed into a superb club for 500 people that's industrial in style while still managing to retain a very cosy feel with luxurious spacious surroundings and a super long bar in the centre of the venue leading to the dancefloor and booth areas.

The 'girls room' even has a row of make-up tables where you can sit and spend some serious time beautifying yourself..

We think there's something for everyone at The Anthologist that will suit all occasions - it's perfect for birthday and hen parties to a get together with friends or just a fun night out..

The music policy is a rich mix of current and Old Skool RnB, Funky House, 90's Soul and Club Classics, 'think Rihanna, Beyonce and Lady GaGa to Neyo, Cameo and Michael Jackson all on one spacious dancefloor..'

Over 21’s and photo I.D. will be needed if you look under 21.

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Nearby alternatives

  1. The Steelyard (0.2 miles)
    All Hallows Lane, The City, EC4R 3UL
  2. Reflex The 80's Bar (0.2 miles)
    Watling Street, The City, EC4M 9BB
  3. The Steelyard (0.2 miles)
    Allhallows Lane, Cannon Street, EC4R 3UL



"It’s a modern, quirky place in the heart of the City and would be an ideal place for groups of young friends after work. "

Review Rating: 8 / 10
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Reviewed by

A few years back I came into the dark but very lively bar here and was impressed with the range of cocktails and the quirky interior design. There are all manner of interesting little touches in the place – including racks of bottles. But the crowds and the lighting meant that I had not noticed that there is a huge restaurant area once you get past the impressively large open bar area.

So I was surprised when a colleague suggested we had a working lunch there – I imagined us eating bar snacks on our laps at the sofas and armchairs. But I was delighted that on arrival I was shown to a raised orange mini-booth (windows one side and a view across the restaurant on the other) which had comfortable bright pastel design high backed chairs. I felt a little bit on display but it was nice to look out over the other diners and comforting to watch the chefs at work in the open kitchen. I even spied a fish counter in the distance!

The young waiter was friendly but quick. We were enchanted with the bread bag (£5.95) – it was almost like opening a Christmas present to look inside and discover the selection of breads hiding within. The focaccia was gorgeous. We dipped away merrily.

I ordered the blue cheese burger (£9.95) which arrived on a wooden board with the chips in a clay flowerpot. There were lots of trimmings. The burger itself was cooked perfectly and well-seasoned. My colleague chose the Thai fish curry (£9.95) – which looked more like an authentic chunky soup. There were even flowers on it. We particularly liked the blue willow patterned plates it was served on. It came with jasmine rice and whilst it was not quite what she had expected, she did enjoy it.

For a change, we each had a glass of Indian wine – a Fratelli (£4.95) which was surprisingly good – light but with a good, clean flavour. At the end we ordered mint tea – which used fresh leaves.

The meal overall came to £47.93 including the 12.5% service charge. So the bags of bread, flowerpots of chips and the bill in a book made it a bit of an adventure. It’s a modern, quirky place in the heart of the City and would be an ideal place for groups of young friends after work.



KimT reviewed The Anthologist on Tue 18 Dec 2012

"I’d definitely head here again if I needed to impress a bunch of young City folk."

Review Rating: 8 / 10
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Reviewed by

After a day working in the City, I met my gay friend by the big tree on London Wall and he suggested that we popped into The Anthologist to check it out. We were a little worried that we were a little too old and not quite cool enough to go there but thought we’d give it a go.

We passed through a few smokers outside and entered into an interior that was at first reminiscent of an upmarket All Bar One which had been treated to an interior design makeover. It was busy. And noisy – but not unpleasantly so.

There were various alcoves and other areas which were clearly in use for private parties – one of which had a number of people with babies in buggies which I thought was a little strange for a bar in the middle of macho financial Cityland.

The walls were adorned with bronze etchings and downstairs (on the way to the loos) I was struck by the neat red handles and was so taken with the décor I almost walked into a mirror that looked like a door. Even the taps in the loos had an elegant designer feel about them – exactly how long can you stay in the ladies without arousing suspicion?

Returning to my colleague we sipped out cocktails (mojito for me at £6.95 and a double Buffalo Bourbon – they didn’t have any Jack Daniels – and coke at £7.80 for him) while taking in the scene around us.

Yes, there were plenty of City and office folk there – mostly in large groups. Many of them leaning against the large, high benches across the side of the room. There were also a good number of smaller groups – possibly mates at the start of a night out – seated at smaller tables or, like us, at one of the low, comfy sofas. There was also a smattering of girl only groups as well as the inevitable boys at the bar.

The bar staff were super efficient – the guys being mostly good looking and the girls being mostly, well, how can I put it delicately?, butch. Forgive me if I didn’t spot any of the more feminine bar staff. Whilst we drank we were struck how busy and efficient all the staff looked – decked out in black, kitted up with walkie-talkies and removing dead glasses with military precision. I guess they have a high turnover of clientele.

As I stood up to leave, a little reluctantly as the squishy armchair I had been sitting in was particularly comfy, I noticed a crate of empty designer bottles on the table. It was a nice touch. But completely superfluous.

So, a lot of substance and bucketfuls of style. I liked it. And I’d definitely head here again if I needed to impress a bunch of young City folk.



KimT reviewed The Anthologist on Wed 10 Aug 2011

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